Recent ECDC publications available online (October 2009)

Since 30 April ECDC has been working on a number of documents related to the influenza A(H1N1) pandemic. As well as Daily Updates, ECDC now publishes a Weekly Executive Update providing a weekly overview of ECDC work and global developments pertaining to pandemic influenza 2009, and a Weekly Influenza Surveillance Overview giving an analysis of the latest surveillance data.

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In addition, the following have been published or updated;

Frequently asked questions

These were updated on 8 October. Read more

Surveillance report:

Annual Epidemiological Report on Communicable Diseases in Europe 2009

This third edition of the Annual Epidemiological Report on Communicable Diseases in Europe provides a comprehensive summary of surveillance data in 2007 and the threats monitored in 2008.

The data presented show that the major threats to the health of European citizens from infectious diseases have not changed substantially since ECDC began its work in 2005.

This year, the Annual Report gives special attention to vaccine-preventable diseases and immunisation programmes in the European Union (EU) and European Economic Area (EEA) countries.

Possible target readership: public health officials, policymakers, experts in disease surveillance, experts in threat monitoring.

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Meeting report:

First meeting of ECDC Expert Group on Climate Change – 07–08 September 2008

Given the sensitivity that many diseases have to climatic factors, it is widely anticipated that climate change will lead to shifts in the transmission ranges of communicable diseases. This meeting was organised to further discuss how ECDC and EU Member States can work together to confront climate change.

An important message from the meeting is that climate change is a threat multiplier: it may generate new threats, but its primary impact will likely be through the ways that it exacerbates existing threats. It will likely alter factors such as the geographical range of disease spread and the seasonality of diseases.

Possible target readership: public health officials, policymakers, experts in climate change, experts in disease surveillance, experts in environmental science.

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