The Public Health Agency of Sweden
Updated 25 November 2021

How to protect yourself and others from being infected with COVID-19

This is a summary of what you can do to protect yourself and others from being infected with COVID-19. There are special recommendations for those who are not vaccinated.

Take responsibility for preventing the spread of infection

Everyone has a responsibility for preventing the spread of infectious diseases. Think about how you can avoid getting infected or infecting others.

Get vaccinated to protect yourself and others

The vaccination offers strong protection against serious illness and the spread of COVID-19.

The Public Health Agency recommends that everyone aged 12 years and above get vaccinated against COVID-19.

Read more: Vaccination against COVID-19

At the website 1177.se you can read about vaccination procedures in the region where you live.

Stay at home and get tested when you have symptoms

  • Pay attention to new symptoms such as a sore throat, runny nose, fever, cough or feeling generally unwell.
  • Stay home if you have these or other symptoms of a respiratory infection.
  • Get tested for COVID-19. This applies both to those who are vaccinated and to those who are not vaccinated.
  • By staying home when you have symptoms, you reduce the spread of COVID-19 and other infections such as influenza and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).
  • Stay home from work, school, preschool and other activities when you have symptoms of a respiratory infection even if you have received a negative test result for COVID-19. It will reduce the spread of other infections.
  • Call telephone number 1177 if you need help assessing your symptoms or advice on where to seek medical care. This is particularly important for people in a risk group who may need care for diseases other than COVID-19, e.g. influenza.

At 1177.se you can read about how testing is organised where you live. Children who have not started preschool class and those who have had confirmed COVID-19 in the past six months do not generally need to get tested.

You can go back when you have tested negative and when you feel well

You can go back to preschool, school, work and other activities when you have tested negative and when you feel well. If you have had a fever you should have been fever-free for at least 24 hours. Some respiratory symptoms may remain some time in those who have recovered from an infection.

How long you need to stay home is individual. In some cases, you will have to be home for a few days, and in others, up to a week or longer. Use the guidelines to help you determine if you or your child are in good enough health to return to preschool, school, activities, and work.

If you test positive for COVID-19, other recommendations apply.

How long should I stay at home?

Stay home if someone in your household falls ill with COVID-19

If someone in your household falls ill with COVID-19 you need to stay home. This is what to do:

  • Stay home for seven days from the day when the infected person in your household took their test. This applies both to those who are vaccinated and to those who are not vaccinated, regardless of whether you have symptoms. Children who have not yet started preschool class also need to stay home.
  • Get tested as soon as possible if you develop symptoms.
  • Get tested after five days if you do not experience any symptoms, counting from the day on which the person in your household tested positive. Children who have not yet started preschool class do not need to get tested, but should stay home.
  • If your test result is negative and you do not develop any symptoms, you can return to school, work and other activities seven days after the person in your household tested positive. Keep paying attention to new symptoms.

People who have had a confirmed COVID-19 infection in the past six months do not need to get tested or stay home if someone they live with falls ill with COVID-19. However, they need to stay home if they develop new symptoms.

If you are unvaccinated, keep a distance from others

Adults who are not vaccinated should be extra careful to protect themselves and others from getting infected. This applies even when you do not have any symptoms.

The Public Health Agency recommends that adults who can get vaccinated but have not yet taken the vaccine show extra consideration for people in a risk group and those over 70 years of age.

This is done by keeping a distance from others whenever possible, and particularly by avoiding close contacts with people who are 70 years or over.

Keep a distance from others at your workplace whenever possible, and avoid crowded areas, such as concerts, night clubs and larger parties.

What to do if you test positive for COVID-19

If you test positive for COVID-19, you should stay home and follow the rules of conduct from the health care services. You can go back to preschool, school, work, and other activities if you have been at home for at least seven days after you showed the first symptoms, and if you have been fever-free for the last two days, and you feel well. Some respiratory symptoms may remain some time in those who have recovered from an infection.

Contact 1177 for medical advice.

In the event of life-threatening conditions, call 112.

Further reading

About COVID-19, vaccinations and testing in different languages